What Every Woman Must Know Before Choosing A Probiotic

By now you’re most likely familiar with probiotics – the good bacteria found in fermented foods and dietary supplements that help keep your digestive tract healthy. But did you know that not all probiotics are the same? There are many different probiotics – called strains – and each provides unique health benefits beyond just good gut health.

Certain probiotic strains are particularly helpful for women, as numerous studies show they can help combat urinary and vaginal health issues. But that’s not all these unique female-friendly microbes can do; some make managing your weight much easier, some help improve the look of your hair and skin, and some even lift your energy and mood.

Digestive Health

If you have tummy issues like gas, bloating, or cramps look for Bifidobacterium breve or Lactobacillus casei, which help restore your gut flora. If you can’t stop going number two, try Lactobacillus acidophilus, which can help ease antibiotic-related diarrhea and prevent extreme cases stemming from infections.

Weight Loss

One recent study showed that women taking Lactobacillus rhamnosus for three months lost 50% more weight than the group of women taking a placebo. Another study involving Lactobacillus gasseri showed reduced body weight, waist size, and hip circumference with belly fat reduced by 8.5%.

Lactobacillus fermentum has wide-ranging benefits for women’s health – shown in studies to help with weight loss and weight management while also protecting against vaginal and urinary tract infections.

Vaginal & Urinary Tract Health

The bacteria genus Lactobacillus is naturally present in your vagina and urinary tract, and their health relies on the right balance of this bacteria. If recurring yeast or urinary tract infections are your concern caused by an overgrowth of harmful bacteria, Lactobacillus acidophilus is the most-researched strain in establishing and maintaining healthy balance. Two other capable strains are Lactobacillus reuteri and Lactobacillus rhamnosus.

Stress & Anxiety

If you’re struggling with anxiety, there’s a probiotic strain that helps that too. Your brain and gut communicate with each other, and both produce the neurotransmitter, serotonin – also known as the happiness chemical.

Medical experts believe a balanced gut is a pro-health way to address mood issues like anxiety because it supports better communication between the gut and the brain. The strains with proven gut-brain benefits are Lactobacillus Plantarum and Lactobacillus reuteri.

Skin & Hair

And speaking of Lactobacillus reuteri, studies show that this remarkable strain may help make your skin look younger and your hair grow longer and stronger. In 2013, a study done on mice
titled “Probiotic Bacteria Induces a Glow of Health” demonstrated doses of Lactobacillus reuteri caused thicker, shinier coats and skin that was more resilient and younger-looking.


Immune System

For immune system support, look for a probiotic supplement with at least 50 billion colony forming units of a combination of lactobacillus and bifidobacterium strains. High counts of these strains support your immune system by decreasing the risk and duration of common infections in the respiratory system and the gut.

And remember, supplementing with probiotics supports your microbiome, especially when your innate good bacteria are challenged by antibiotics, travel, poor diet, and pathogens like viruses.

Keeping your female microbiome in balance is easy…

Many factors influence the balance of your microbiome, including your stress levels and what you eat. To help keep your microbiome and you in balance, eat more fermented foods, and take a daily probiotic supplement like Stonehenge Health Dynamic Biotics.

Dynamic Biotics formulation contains all the probiotic strains proven to help support a woman’s specific health needs. It is also synbiotic, meaning it contains both probiotics and prebiotics in one capsule. Prebiotics are the food that probiotics consume and which help them survive and thrive in your digestive tract.

Dynamic Biotics doesn’t need to be refrigerated, comes in a dark amber glass bottle to block out moisture and light, and is meticulously inspected and tested for quality, plus it’s vegan, free of gluten, dairy, soy, binders, and fillers. With just one easy to take delayed-release capsules to resist stomach acid, Dynamic Biotics is an easy way to feel and look your best.

Sources:
 1. "Bifidobacterium Breve - Probiotics Database". 2020. Probiotics Database. https://probioticsdb.com/probiotic-strains/bifidobacterium-breve/.

2. "Lactobacillus Brevis – Probioticsamerica.Com". 2020. Probioticsamerica.Com. https://probioticsamerica.com/lactobacillus-brevis/.

3. Effect of probiotics, Bifidobacterium breve and Lactobacillus casei, on bisphenol A exposure in rats. Biosci Biotechnol Biochem. 2008 Jun;72(6):1409-15. Epub 2008 Jun 7. PMID: 18540113

4. "Lactobacillus Acidophilus - Health Encyclopedia - University Of Rochester Medical Center ". 2020. Urmc.Rochester.Edu. https://www.urmc.rochester.edu/encyclopedia/content.aspx?contenttypeid=19&contentid=Lactobacillus.

5. Homayouni A, et al. 2020. "Effects Of Probiotics On The Recurrence Of Bacterial Vaginosis: A Review. - Pubmed - NCBI ". Ncbi.Nlm.Nih.Gov. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24299970.

6. "Lactobacillus Reuteri - An Overview | Sciencedirect Topics". 2020. Sciencedirect.Com. https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/immunology-and-microbiology/lactobacillus-reuteri.

7. Falagas ME, et al. 2020. "Probiotics For Prevention Of Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections In Women: A Review Of The Evidence From Microbiological And Clinical Studies. - Pubmed - NCBI ". Ncbi.Nlm.Nih.Gov. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16827601


 8. Pendharkar, Sonal, Erik Brandsborg, Lennart Hammarström, Harold Marcotte, and Per-Göran Larsson. 2015. "Vaginal Colonisation By Probiotic Lactobacilli And Clinical Outcome In Women Conventionally Treated For Bacterial Vaginosis And Yeast Infection". BMC Infectious Diseases 15 (1). doi:10.1186/s12879-015-0971-3.


 9. Sanchez, Marina, Christian Darimont, Vicky Drapeau, Shahram Emady-Azar, Melissa Lepage, Enea Rezzonico, and Catherine Ngom-Bru et al. 2013. "Effect Of Lactobacillus Rhamnosus CGMCC1.3724 Supplementation On Weight Loss And Maintenance In Obese Men And Women". British Journal Of Nutrition 111 (8): 1507-1519. doi:10.1017/s0007114513003875.

The Power of 3 for Optimal Digestive Health

If having better gut health (or maintaining the good gut health you currently enjoy) is one of your self-care goals, there is no better way than by adding the power of three – probiotics, prebiotics, and digestive enzymes.

Putting these three powerful tools together will help improve your digestion and help eliminate digestive issues. Together they can also help maximize the nutrition you get from everything you eat, which boosts your immune system and your overall health.

 

Your Gut Health

Your gut contains trillions of both good and bad bacteria; together, they make up your gut microbiome. When your microbiome is in balance, meaning good bacteria dominate and far outnumber harmful bacteria – all of your bodily systems work better.

Eating yogurt and fermented foods rich in probiotics is an excellent way to help maintain gut balance. Another way you can help the good bacteria thrive is by taking probiotics and prebiotic supplements together.

 

Probiotics & Prebiotics – What’s the Difference?

Think of the relationship between probiotics and prebiotics like a garden. Probiotics are the diverse plants, flowers, and trees that bring the garden to life. Prebiotics are like fertilizer that helps the plants in your garden grow lush and strong.

Probiotics contain beneficial bacteria that help your gut perform many duties that dramatically benefit your overall health. Probiotics supplements reinforce helpful bacteria, delivering microbes directly to where you need them.

Prebiotics are types of starches and fiber that feed the good bacteria in your microbiome and allow them to thrive.

But that’s not all prebiotics do for you; their benefits go beyond food for good gut bacteria. Prebiotics strengthen your bones by enhancing the absorption of magnesium and calcium. Prebiotic also take part in fat metabolism and appetite regulation.

Taking prebiotic and probiotic supplements together like Stonehenge Health’s Dynamic Biotics and Ulitmate Prebiotic Complex helps create a more balanced microbiome, leading to better digestion, fewer gastric disruptions, and more complete nutrient absorption. And better nutrient absorption means your entire body gets more of what it needs for health and wellbeing.

Digestive Enzymes

Enzymes are a type of protein within cells that create chemical reactions. Your body contains many different kinds of enzymes that help perform various tasks like removing toxins from your body, digesting food, and building muscles. Digestive enzymes are enzymes that turn the food you eat into the molecules you use as energy.

There are four primary digestive enzymes. Protease helps breakdown protein. Amylase comes from the salivary glands, pancreas, and intestines to break down starch and carbs. Lactase breaks down lactose or milk sugar. And lipase comes from the intestines and breaks down oils and fats.

Several factors impact your digestive enzymes. Food choices can either help or hinder them, and certain foods like pineapple, papaya, mango, and spinach contain some digestive enzymes.

Unhealthy things we consume like alcohol can alter the stomach and intestines’ pH and reduce the number of digestive enzymes in your system. Some health issues and prescription medications like antibiotics can also reduce digestive enzymes.

Without enough digestive enzymes, your body can’t digest your food correctly, which leads to food intolerances that feel like cramps, uncomfortable bloating, and gas or worse. When the enzymes in your body are affected, or your digestive enzyme production isn’t as good as it should be, digestive enzyme supplements can help.

Digestive enzyme supplements help fortify the enzymes in your stomach and intestines to help improve digestion. Chose a digestive enzyme supplement like Stonehenge Health’s Incredible Digestive Enzymes that contains a complete range of enzymes able to break down the most troublesome foods like dairy and gluten.

Whether you reach for prebiotic or probiotic supplements, digestive enzymes, or all three, it’s well worth the benefits you’ll feel. Boosting your gut health will give you long-term benefits that affect your entire body, get more nutrition from the foods you eat and give you a more robust immune system, and so much more.

Sources:

  1. “Probiotics | American Gastroenterological Association”. 2020. American Gastroenterological Association. https://gastro.org/practice-guidance/gi-patient-center/topic/probiotics/.Bottom of Form
  2. Deng Y, Misselwitz B, Dai N, Fox M. Lactose Intolerance in Adults: Biological Mechanism and Dietary ManagementNutrients. 2015;7(9):8020-35. doi:10.3390/nu7095380
  3. Peyrot des Gachons C, Breslin PA. Salivary amylase: digestion and metabolic syndromeCurr Diab Rep. 2016;16(10):102. doi:10.1007/s11892-016-0794-7
  4. Legette, LeeCole L., WangHee Lee, Berdine R. Martin, Jon A. Story, Jessica K. Campbell, and Connie M. Weaver. 2012. “Prebiotics Enhance Magnesium Absorption And Inulin-Based Fibers Exert Chronic Effects On Calcium Utilization In A Postmenopausal Rodent Model”. Journal Of Food Science77 (4): 88-94. doi:10.1111/j.1750-3841.2011.02612.x.
  5. FDA 101: Dietary supplements. (2015).gov/consumers/consumer-updates/fda-101-dietary-supplements
  6. Gut reaction: A limited role for digestive enzyme supplements. (2018).harvard.edu/staying-healthy/gut-reaction-a-limited-role-for-digestive-enzyme-supplements
  7. “Probiotics | American Gastroenterological Association”. 2020. American Gastroenterological Association. https://gastro.org/practice-guidance/gi-patient-center/topic/probiotics/
  8. “23 Effects Of Alcohol On Your Body”. 2020. Healthline. https://www.healthline.com/health/alcohol/effects-on-body#2.

How to Improve Your Digestion & Stay Healthier in Winter

Who doesn’t love to snuggle up at home during the cold, winter months binge-watching Netflix and awards shows, and enjoying more than one or two pizza deliveries? But that kind of “winter chill” can lower your metabolism and wreak havoc on your digestive system – leading to stomach discomfort and weight gain. Even worse, an unhealthy digestive system weakens your immune system and leaves you vulnerable to viruses and illnesses.

So here’s a quick rundown of food and lifestyle strategies you can adopt to improve your digestion – helping you enjoy good health all winter long.

 

Eat those winter veggies.

Sweet potatoes, carrots, squash, turnips, and beets are plentiful in the winter, and they’re packed with vitamins and minerals that do a body good–especially in your digestive tract. Winter greens like kale, chard, spinach, and Brussels sprouts are loaded with vitamin C, boosting your immune system and providing your gut with the fiber it needs for healthy balanced functioning.

 

Use lots of spices.

Spices like turmeric and ginger have been used for centuries to soothe intestinal woes. Turmeric is widely used to reduce symptoms of IBS, including cramps, constipation, and diarrhea. Ginger soothes upset stomachs.

Cumin used extensively in Hispanic dishes can help eliminate gas and bloating. If you like it spicy, cayenne pepper stimulates digestion and can even help repair damage to your gut lining.

 

Eat more, smaller meals.

Instead of loading up on three squares a day, try grazing instead. Grazing is the informal name of the eating habit that involves consuming many, smaller meals throughout the day. While the jury is still out about whether this eating style promotes weight loss, a substantial body of research shows that eating six to ten smaller meals a day improves satiety and decreases bloating and other digestive discomforts. However, you’ll want to be sure you’re choosing appropriate foods and portions at each eating interval as to not overdo it.

 

Stay hydrated.

Since winter doesn’t find most of us outside losing liquids to the heat, we often under-hydrate during the winter months, which can cause constipation and other digestive problems. Just because you don’t feel thirsty doesn’t mean you don’t need water.

In fact, by the time you feel thirsty, you’re probably already dehydrated. Even when you aren’t losing water through sweating, your body needs roughly 64 ounces a day for optimal functioning, including gastrointestinal and kidney function.

 

Exercise.

Moving your body stimulates digestion, and it helps you maintain a healthy digestive system. Strive to get in 30 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise, such as walking or biking, most days of the week.

 

Take a probiotic.

Probiotics like Stonehenge Health’s Dynamic Biotics have a wide range of benefits for your digestive and overall health. Probiotics are healthy gut bacteria that promote optimal digestion and nutrient absorption. Numerous things can lead to imbalances in the gut microbiome, including a poor diet, certain medications, and excessive alcohol consumption.

A daily probiotic helps to restore colonies of healthy bacteria to reduce digestive symptoms. Probiotics have also been shown to improve your immune function, which helps prevent colds and other seasonal illnesses that can further slow down your digestive system in the winter.

Keeping your digestive and overall health in tip-top shape over the winter months requires a healthy diet and plenty of physical activity. To boost your digestion, supplementation with a daily probiotic gives your gut the healthy bacteria it needs to function well despite long nights curled up and content on the couch.

 
 

Sources:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4227268/
https://nutrition.org/small-frequent-meals/
https://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/discussion/probiotics-may-be-effective-in-preventing-the-common-cold/

Ginger and Turmeric: The Dynamic Duo for Better Health

No two spices have been as extensively studied for their healing ability as turmeric and ginger. Both are staples in Ancient Chinese Medicine used to treat a variety of conditions from headaches to stomach upset. They’re also two spices ubiquitously used in Asain dishes for their aromatic flavor – and for the health boost, they bestow on those that consume them.

Ginger is the root of the ginger plant. It adds a zesty flavor to stir-fries and sauces and can be found year-round at your local organic produce store.

Turmeric, a staple of Indian cuisine, belongs in the same botanical family as ginger. Its deep yellow hue adds vibrant color to curries and other dishes.

 

The Health Benefits of Ginger

Ginger is best known for settling the stomach since it can eliminate intestinal gas and soothe the intestinal tract. Several studies show that ginger can help prevent motion sickness, including seasickness. Ginger is widely used as an antiemetic, meaning it can prevent vomiting, especially during pregnancy.

Ginger is a powerful anti-inflammatory that helps reduce inflammation, swelling, and pain, particularly from osteoarthritis and rheumatism. One study found that a powdered ginger supplement taken for three months reduced pain and swelling in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and general muscle pain. This same study also indicated that a 250-milligram capsule of ginger is as effective as ibuprofen and mefenamic acid for relieving menstrual cramps.

Several studies show that ginger may help inhibit oxidative stress. Some additional evidence supports ginger for better cardiovascular function. In several animal studies, ginger had not only anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects, but also antiplatelet, hypotensive, and hypolipidemic effects.

 

The Health Benefits of Turmeric

Turmeric, like ginger, is a powerful anti-inflammatory and reduces symptoms associated with inflammation. This makes it an effective way to help prevent a range of inflammatory diseases and conditions, including Alzheimer’s disease, multiple sclerosis, cardiovascular disease, and metabolic syndrome.

Curcumin is the active agent that gives turmeric its vibrant color and is also responsible for its healing ability. Consuming curcumin supplements can significantly improve symptoms of osteoarthritis, including less pain and better physical function. One study found that, like ginger, curcumin worked as well as ibuprofen for reducing discomfort, and with no side effects.

Metabolic syndrome is a health condition that occurs when several ailments are stacked together like heart disease with type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance is often a consequence of metabolic syndrome, as are hyperglycemia, hypertension, and elevated cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Curcumin improves insulin sensitivity and reduces blood pressure, inflammation, and oxidative stress.

Curcumin may improve kidney function by reducing bile duct blockage and delaying the damage that eventually causes cirrhosis — reducing beta-amyloid plaque, which is a marker of brain senescence. Curcumin also lowers plasma alanine aminotransferase and beta-amyloid plaque, both markers of liver damage.

Research shows that even low doses of curcumin can provide health benefits for healthy people, helping to prevent a range of diseases and conditions.

 

Curcumin and Ginger Supplements for Therapeutic Doses

A healthy diet that includes plenty of ginger and turmeric can help prevent or improve inflammatory conditions and other woes and enhances your overall health and wellbeing. Together, these two spices are a powerful one-two punch against inflammation and oxidative damage.

But here’s the truth. Unless you love the taste ginger and turmeric and prepare every daily dish with these spices, it’s unlikely you’ll get enough curcumin and ginger to experience the full benefit of their health-boosting ability.

Stonehenge Health’s Turmeric with Ginger is a powerful blend containing 1,600 milligrams of turmeric curcumin complex with 140 milligrams of ginger root extract. BioPerine has been added to improve bioavailability, ensuring your body gets the maximum daily benefit possible from these two amazing nutrients.

Now, add daily exercise and a positive attitude, and you’re well on your way to a happier, healthier life!

Sources:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK92775/
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5664031/

6 Ways to Get Your Weight Back on Track after the Holidays

Are you feeling an extra inch or two around your middle?

This time of year, sweet and savory temptations surround us. And unless you’re superhuman, total resistance to all the delicious holiday delights is almost impossible.

No wonder experts say that between Thanksgiving and Jan 1, the average American adult gains about one pound. Now, one pound might not sound like a whole lot. But problems arise when that extra pound sticks around long after the holidays are over. After a few years of accumulated holiday pounds, the excess weight adds up.

But don’t worry. Losing holiday weight gain is easier than you think. Keep reading for a few simple things that you can do to get yourself back on track, and jump-start your way into a fit and healthy new year!

 

#1. Exercise Every Day for One Month

There’s nothing better for your body than moving. Study after study shows that exercise can both improve the quality and the duration of your life. Exercise every day can also help you quickly drop a few pounds while toning up your body.

Now there’s no stopping you from keeping the daily exercise going as long as possible. But by giving yourself a short term, incremental goals, you are much more likely to reach your ultimate weight loss and fitness objectives.

 

#2 Find A Friend To Workout With

What’s more motivating than knowing someone is saving you a mat at the pilates studio? Working out with a friend helps you avoid skipping your daily exercise when you’re feeling less than inspired. You’re more likely to meet your weight loss goals with a friend because you’re simply less likely to give up. And studies show, when you work out with a friend, you work harder too.

 

 #3 Ditch Unhealthy Holiday Treats

Is your fridge full of holiday leftovers, cakes, candies, and treats? This may sound crazy, but -open the fridge door, pull out every weight-buster you see – and throw it all away. If you can’t stand the idea of tossing good food, donate it to your local food pantry. Getting temptation out of your site is the only way you to avoid adding them to your waistline. And when your fridge is empty, fill it up with fresh, healthy, wholesome food – only.

 

#4 Be Prepared

When you’re extra busy at work, and hunger is gnawing at you, that’s when you are most likely to reach for a readily available – and unhealthy sweet treat. The key here is preparation. Prepare all your food for work the night before. When your meals are ready to go, you won’t make unhealthy, spontaneous choices. And while you’re at it – get your fitness bag ready too. Make sure there’s no excuse to skip the gym – remember, your buddy is waiting!

 

#5 Drink Lots of Water

Drinking lots of water cleanses your body of toxins, boosts your metabolism, and even suppresses your appetite. Drinking lots of water also stops your body from retaining water – leading it to drop extra water weight.

Thirst can make you think you’re hungry when you just need water. So before you decide on a snack, drink a glass of water first.

 

#6 Gut Health is Everything

The holidays are the prime season for overindulging on sugar, alcohol, and unhealthy fat – all things that throw your gut microbiome out of whack and make digestive issues much more likely.

At the same time, you’re less likely to eat high fiber foods that your helpful gut bacteria need to survive. Taking a probiotic supplement reseeds your gut, keeping your digestive health on track.

When it comes to holiday weight gain, studies show that taking probiotics from the Lactobacillus family can help. A study done on L. Fermentum showed it reduced weight by 3-4% over 6 weeks. That means a person weighing 165 pounds can lose 6.6 pounds just taking this one probiotic daily.

Fermentum, along with other strains shown to help you lose weight is included in the 16 strains of probiotics in Stonehenge Health’s Dynamic Biotics.


Learn More >>

Sources:

Omar, Jaclyn M., Yen-Ming Chan, Mitchell L. Jones, Satya Prakash, and Peter J.H. Jones. 2013. “Lactobacillus Fermentum And Lactobacillus Amylovorus As Probiotics Alter Body Adiposity And Gut Microflora In Healthy Persons”. Journal Of Functional Foods 5 (1): 116-123. Elsevier BV. doi:10.1016/j.jff.2012.09.001.

5 Common Signs of a Gluten Sensitivity and How to Remedy It

Gluten has, in recent years, been demonized in many circles, leading to a mass boycott of this family of proteins. But gluten is harmless if you don’t have an adverse reaction to it.

Gluten is found in wheat, rye, spelt, and barley. Gluten consists of two main proteins called glutenin and gliadin. When these two proteins mix with water, they become glue-like in consistency, hence the name. Gluten gives bread dough it’s elastic nature and gives the final product its much-beloved chewy texture.

Around one percent of the population has celiac disease, which is the most severe form of gluten intolerance. In people with celiac disease, the immune system believes that the gluten proteins are foreign invaders, and it attacks them–along with the gut wall. Classified as an autoimmune disease, celiac disease can cause severe damage to the digestive system.

Gluten sensitivity, also known as non-celiac gluten sensitivity, is different from celiac disease and has milder symptoms. Unlike celiac disease, gluten sensitivity doesn’t damage the gut lining, but it can cause serious intestinal discomfort nonetheless.

Studies show that the majority of people who believe they’re gluten intolerant may not have a gluten sensitivity at all. One study found that only 25 percent of those who reported gluten sensitivity met the diagnostic criteria. That doesn’t mean that eating a lot of gluten still won’t make your gut unhappy.

Common Symptoms of Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity

The symptoms associated with gluten sensitivity are wide-ranging, and some, like headaches, aren’t directly related to digestion. On their own, each symptom can have a myriad of causes. But if multiple symptoms occur together, it could be a sign of gluten sensitivity. The following are the five most common signs of non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

1. Bloating


Bloating is a very common digestive woe, and it’s associated with all kinds of foods and conditions. Research shows that around 87 percent of people with non-celiac gluten sensitivity experience frequent bloating discomfort.

2. Diarrhea and constipation


People who have regular bouts of diarrhea or constipation may be gluten-sensitive, especially if their feces are particularly foul-smelling. A recent study found that over half of people with gluten sensitivity have frequent diarrhea, and around 25 percent experience regular constipation.

3. Headaches


While headaches are very common and have numerous causes, regular headaches that occur along with digestive symptoms can indicate a gluten sensitivity. In fact, some studies show that gluten-sensitive people may be more likely to experience migraines than non-sensitive people.

4. Fatigue


Up to 82 percent of people with gluten sensitivity frequently feel tired and fatigued, according to research, especially after eating foods containing gluten. In some cases, gluten intolerance can cause anemia, which contributes to fatigue.

5. Skin issues


Skin problems are common in people with celiac disease, and they can also indicate a gluten sensitivity in those without celiac. Skin problems associated with gluten sensitivity include psoriasis (scaly, red skin), alopecia areata (non-scarring hair loss), and chronic urticaria (itchy, pink or red lesions with pale centers).

How Gluten Sensitivity is Diagnosed and Treated

Non-celiac gluten sensitivity is diagnosed if:

•You experience immediate symptoms after ingesting gluten.
•You cut out gluten and symptoms disappear.
•You re-introduce gluten and experience symptoms again.
•Medical exams rule out celiac disease and wheat allergy.
•A blinded gluten test confirms non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

If you have non-celiac gluten sensitivity, the most important thing to do is to take good care of your digestive health every day to reduce symptoms. A daily probiotic like Stonehenge Health’s Dynamic Biotics can help keep your gut flora in balance to reduce digestive discomfort, while our Incredible Digestive Enzymes support gluten digestion as well as the digestion of carbs, dairy, and fiber.

Depending on your symptoms and the severity of your gluten sensitivity, you may need to avoid gluten altogether, although some people with this condition can consume small amounts of gluten without too much trouble. Through trial and error, and with supplemental digestive support, you can find out what works best for you.





 

 

Sources:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24740495
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19362553
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24885375/
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12741468/
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4003198/

The 10 Worst Foods for IBS

For many people with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), symptoms may be triggered by specific foods. What triggers your symptoms may be different from what triggers the symptoms of fellow sufferers, but these 10 foods are likely culprits for anyone with IBS.

1. Gluten

Although gluten is often unfairly demonized, it’s fair to say that gluten can be a major trigger for IBS. Gluten is a type of protein found in certain grains, including rye, wheat, and barley. Many people who have IBS are also gluten intolerant and may experience symptoms like bloating, cramps, and diarrhea.

2. Fried Foods

Fried foods are high in fat and can be particularly hard on the digestive systems of people who have IBS. Frying food makes it more difficult to digest, so other cooking methods are recommended for people with IBS and other gastrointestinal problems.

3. Caffeine

Coffee and other drinks containing caffeine stimulate the intestines and can cause diarrhea. Instead of consuming drinks with caffeine when you need a little boost, go for a brisk walk.

4. Artificial Sweeteners

Artificial sweeteners are found in sugarless gum, candy, and diet drinks. Commonly used artificial sweeteners include acesulfame potassium, aspartame, and sucralose, and since these and other sugar substitutes are difficult for the body to absorb, they can easily trigger IBS symptoms.

5. Alcohol

Many people with IBS have trouble drinking alcohol because of how their body digests it. The dehydrating effects of alcohol are also problematic for people with IBS. If you enjoy drinking alcohol, stick with gluten-free beer, or enjoy a cocktail mixed with soda water.

6. Broccoli and Cauliflower

While broccoli and cauliflower are healthy vegetables, they’re not always ideal for people with IBS. These vegetables are among the hardest for people to digest, and when they’re broken down in the intestines, they produce gas and may cause constipation.

7. Insoluble Fiber

Insoluble fiber is that which can’t be digested. Although it adds healthy bulk to your diet, insoluble fiber can make diarrhea worse for people with IBS. Soluble fiber, which is found in grains, root vegetables, legumes, and berries, is a better choice if you have digestive woes.

8. Dairy

Dairy products contain fat, which can worsen diarrhea. They also contain lactose, and since many people with IBS are also lactose intolerant, dairy products may need to be restricted. Suitable dairy substitutes include rice, soy, or nut milks and cheeses.

9. Beans and Legumes

For some people, beans and legumes can help reduce constipation by increasing the bulk in the stool. But they’re also notorious for causing gas, cramping, and bloating, especially in people with IBS. Different varieties can produce different results, so trial and error may help you find which types you can safely eat.

10. Processed Foods

Highly processed foods like bread, crackers, sweets, and chips contain high levels of fat, sugar, preservatives, and other additives that can cause problems with digestion. Choosing mostly fresh, whole foods is the healthiest way to eat whether or not you have IBS.

Everyone’s IBS triggers are different, and once you know what yours are, staying away from those foods will help you remain as symptom-free as possible. Regardless of what you eat, a daily probiotic like Stonehenge Health’s Dynamic Biotics can help you maintain optimal gut flora balance for better digestion and fewer IBS symptoms.



Sources:
https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/digestive-diseases/irritable-bowel-syndrome/eating-diet-nutrition
https://www.health.harvard.edu/a_to_z/irritable-bowel-syndrome-ibs-a-to-z

How to Stop Urinary Tract Infections Before They Start

Urinary tract infections, or UTIs, are common in women, especially as we age. Unfortunately, UTIs are commonly over-diagnosed and over-treated with antibiotics, which can lead to antibiotic-resistant organisms.

Urinary tract infections have a number of causes. A UTI may result when urine pools in the bladder due to an obstructed urinary flow, and the pooled urine grows bacteria. It can also occur when harmful bacteria cling to the urethra and make their way to the bladder. Other causes include sexual activity and a lack of estrogen in the lining of the vagina, which helps protect against UTIs.

Symptoms of a UTI include frequent urination, an urgency to urinate, and a burning sensation that accompanies urination. In elderly women, confusion is a common symptom of a UTI, and it’s often the only symptom. Left untreated, a UTI can lead to a kidney infection, which can be very dangerous, even life-threatening.

How to Prevent UTIs

Prevention is best when it comes to urinary tract infections, especially for older women and those who tend to get them often. Here are the best ways to prevent a UTI.

Stay well-hydrated.
Adequate hydration helps you produce plenty of urine to dilute and flush bad bacteria from the bladder and urethra. Avoid sugary drinks and stick to water for most of your fluid intake.

Take vitamin C.
Vitamin C helps make your urine more acidic, which may prevent the growth of bad bacteria. Get vitamin C from citrus fruits, berries, and leafy greens, or take a 500-to-1,000 milligram supplement each day.

Eat (or drink) cranberries.
Perhaps one of the most well-known anti-UTI measures is consuming cranberries, which prevent bacteria from adhering to the lining of the urinary tract. Eat dried cranberries, add them to salads or rice, or drink a little unsweetened cranberry juice each day.

Wipe from front to back.
Bacteria hang out around the anus and wiping from back to front can introduce them to your vagina, where they can migrate to the urinary tract.

Urinate after sex.
During sex, bacteria are introduced into the vagina. Urinating afterwards helps to flush it out.

Avoid feminine deodorant products.
The best way to stay fresh is to shower often with mild soap and water. Products like douches, deodorant sprays, and powders can cause a UTI and other problems.

Apply estrogen vaginal cream.
If you’ve gone through menopause, you have less estrogen in your body, which can cause vaginal dryness and promote infection in the urinary tract. Estrogen creams help balance your pH so that good bacteria will flourish.

Take a probiotic. Probiotics are live “good” bacteria in your body that are involved in numerous functions to keep you healthy. According to Harvard University Medical School, taking a daily probiotic may help prevent UTIs by preventing bad bacteria from growing in the vagina. Stonehenge Health’s Dynamic Biotics contains all nine of the most important bacteria strains recommended for women.

If you get a UTI despite preventive measures, treating it early on is the best way to prevent severe symptoms and complications. If you have symptoms of a UTI, pay a visit to your doctor and consider starting a daily probiotic routine.


 

Sources:
https://www.health.harvard.edu/diseases-and-conditions/stay-a-step-ahead-of-urinary-tract-infections

 

 

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